Summer Reading

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One of summer’s sweetest delights is catching up on my reading list.  I start the summer off with a visit to a used bookstore and glean all the titles and authors I can find that are on the list I’ve kept all year.  This summer I also treated myself to a Barnes and Noble splurge for my birthday in June.

Since I am a used book store junkie, you’ll find that many of my titles are not new. There are newer books on my reading list, but my finds are generally at least a couple of years old.  While I am reading this stock of books, a newer inventory will come into the store and I will search them out later.  This system works well to join my love of reading with my budget.

Here are a few of my favorites from what I’ve read so far this summer:

I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai.  This is the autobiography of the young Pakistani girl who was shot by the Taliban for being vocal in her support of education for girls.  She survived and continues to address women’s education issues around the world.  She is 19 years old now.

The appeal of this book for me was not so much the writing style, but the fact that Malala was only 15 years old when she became famous for surviving such terror.  She is clearly an adolescent, talking about fights with her brother, clothing styles and blushing about boys. Yet she shifts into a mature persona when discussing her work and speaking engagements.  Her story inspires me and makes me hope that I would be able to stand  up for my own beliefs if the day ever comes when I need to.

The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton.  This novel spans several generations.  It tells of the lives of three women, each from a different era, and intertwines their stories.  I suggest reading this in book format, rather than digital, as you may have to flip back and forth to follow the dates in each woman’s tale as time moves back and forth.  The author cleverly creates a cameo appearance by Frances Hodgson Burnett and suggests that perhaps her classic story, The Secret Garden, was born from her visit to the enchanting garden that is central to this novel.

Though long, this was an easy summer read.  I was mildly puzzled by what seemed like a change in one of the main character’s voice about two-thirds of the way through, as well as an important piece of information that seemed thrown in at the last minute.  It is possible that I was distracted for a transitional page.  Either way, I made the adjustment and was compelled to keep turning pages until I reached the conclusion.  I liked this well enough that at some point I will read Morton’s newer novel, The Lake House.

The House I Loved by Tatiana de Rosnay.  This is a work of fiction which takes place during the modernization of Paris in the 1860’s.  It is told through a series of letters written by a 60-year-old woman as she hides in her house, which is slated to be demolished along with the rest of her neighborhood.  Her letters are to her deceased husband and express what their home has meant to them over the years.  The house and the woman are symbolic of each other as both embrace and protect their family at any cost.

I found this book to be heart-wrenchingly beautiful.  The letter format (epistolary, as de Rosnay says)  is a unique style and makes the telling much more intimate.   It should be read for its own merits and not compared to de Rosnay’s earlier best-selling novel, Sarah’s Key, which I also would recommend.

Some of the books still piled on my queue are:

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.  I know nothing about this book, but keep hearing how much everyone else has enjoyed it.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood.  I’m probably the last person on earth to read this story, but better late than never.

The Paris Wife by Paula McLain.  I also want to read Circling the Sun by the same author.

Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout.  I was looking for her novel, My Name Is Lucy Barton, but found this older one instead.  Strout is a new author for me.

About Grace by Anthony Doerr.  I was enthralled by All the Light We Cannot See by Doerr, so I am going back and reading his first novel published.

Gift from the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh.  This title was thoughtfully recommended in a comment left by another blogger on a previous post.

As you can see, I will run out of summer before I run out of books to read.

So, what are you reading?  Please leave recommendations in the comments section, and note titles to add to your own reading list.

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8 thoughts on “Summer Reading”

  1. I’m like you and always go used. I’ve discovered my public library is online. Has been for a while but I’m finally taking advantage. This summer I’ve read:
    1- For one more day by Mitch Albom
    2- Let’s pretend this never happened and 3- Furiously happy:A funny story about horrible things by Jenny Lawson
    4- Confessions of a sociopath: A life spent hiding in plain sight by ME Thomas
    5- Concussion by Jeanne Marie Laskas
    6- People I want to punch in the throat: Competitive crafters, drop off despots and suburban scourges by Jen Mann
    7- It was me all along: A memoir by Andie Mitchell
    8- Bad Kid: A memoir by David Crabb
    9- The curious incident of the dog in the night time: A novel by Mark Haddon
    10-End of Watch by Stephen King
    11-A prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m currently reading The Sins of the Mother by Danielle Steel. It was featured on bookdaily.com a few days ago, and I decided to splurge and buy it from Audible.

    After that, I plan to read Yellow Crocus by Laila Ibrahim. This book has been in my Audible wish list for ages, and today, it’s on sale for only $2.95. I couldn’t pass that up. I review books I’ve read on my blog at http://abbiescorner.wordpress.com .

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Gift from the Sea is one of my favorite books. It will carry you right back to the ocean you tried to capture in your Zen Garden And, no, you are not the last person to read A Handmaid’s Tale! I am re-reading all of Barbara Kingsolver’s books, and The Poisonwood Bible is one of the most powerful, heart-rending stories ever told. Best, Tanja

    Like

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